ADLib Glossary (I)

Definition:

Inert Waste

Waste that does not undergo any significant physical, chemical or biological transformations. Inert waste will not dissolve, burn, or otherwise physically or chemically react, biodegrade or adversely affect other matter which it comes into contact in a way likely to cause environmental pollution or harm to human health.

The following definition of inert is taken from the Landfill (England and Wales) Regulations 2002. Waste is inert if

  1. it does not undergo any significant physical, chemical or biological transformations;
  2. it does not dissolve, burn or otherwise physically or chemically react, biodegrade or adversely affect other matter with which it comes into contact in a way likely to give rise to environmental pollution or harm to human health; and
  3. its total leachability and pollutant content and the ecotoxicity of its leachate are insignificant and, in particular, do not endanger the quality of any surface water or groundwater.

Waste considered inert by the Aggregates Quality Protocol.

European Waste Catalogue Code Description Restrictions
10 11 03 Waste glass based fibrous materials Only without organic binders
15 01 07 Glass packaging Selected construction and demolition waste acceptable only with low content of other types of materials (like metals, plastics, organics, wood, rubber etc). The origin of the waste must be known.
17 01 01 Concrete including solid dewatered concrete process waste
17 01 02 Bricks
17 01 03 Tiles and ceramics
17 01 07 Mixtures of concrete, bricks, tiles and ceramics
17 02 02 Glass  
17 05 04

17 05 08

Soils and stones including gravel, crushed rock, sand, clay, road base and planings, and track ballast. Excluding topsoil, peat; excluding soil and stones from contaminated sites.
19 12 05 Glass  
20 01 02 Glass Separately collected glass only
20 02 02 Soils and stones restricted to parks waste Only from garden and parks waste; excluding topsoil, peat

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