Salmonella: Code of Practice for the Control of (PB2202)

7. Bacteriological Monitoring

7.1 All raw materials should be subject to monitoring for the presence of salmonella. the aim of the monitoring is to:

  • Check on the bacteriological quality of raw materials; and
  • If necessary, to take any necessary corrective action. The information gained by this monitoring should be used to help select sources of raw materials which most consistently provide the desired quality (in the case of material entering stores) or to monitor the effectiveness of microbiological hygiene (in the case of material leaving stores), and identify the need for corrective action where problems are detected. In the case of stores handling raw materials of more than one type or source, each individual storage facility should be regarded as a separate store for sampling purposes.

7.2 Monitoring of material entering stores
Owners of raw materials entering stores (other than intervention stores or on-farm stores) should aim to ensure that representative aggregate samples are collected and submitted for testing for salmonella. Aggregate samples should be collected over a period of one month (30 days) or less. In the case of imported materials this sampling should be carried out at the point where the cargo discharges. On the basis of the test results, three categories of risk (high, medium and low) should be established by the storekeeper taking into account the history of each source of raw material. The frequency of sampling and monitoring for each category of raw material entering stores should vary in accordance with the established risk factor, increasing for high risk and decreasing for low risk materials.

7.3 Monitoring of products despatched from stores that have been tested in accordance with 7.2.
On each day the material is despatched at least one sample should be taken for aggregation. Aggregate samples should not contain more than 40 incremental samples collected over a period of more than one month (30 days). On the basis of the test results, three categories of risk (high, medium and low) should be established relating to the previous microbiological testing history of despatched raw material. Continued sampling and monitoring for each category of despatched material should vary in accordance with the established risk factor, increasing for high risk and decreasing for low risk materials.

7.4 The results of tests on material entering and leaving stores should be compared in order to identify whether contamination is taking place during storage. If contamination is occuring, the source of the contamination should be sought and corrective action should be taken.

7.5. Monitoring of products despatched from stores that have not been tested in accordance with 7.2.
The owners of raw materials despatched from stores, or warrant holders taking out future grain, should ensure, in collaboration with the storekeeper and any other party involved, that raw materials are representatively sampled and aggregate samples are submitted for testing. On each day the material is despatched, at least one sample must be taken for aggregation. Aggregagte samples must not contain more than 40 incremental samples or materials collected over a period of more than one month (30 days).

7.6. Monitoring of manufactured products and by-products leaving the place of manufacture.
On each day the material is despatched at least one sample should be taken for aggregation. Aggregate samples must not contain more than 40 incremental samples or materials collected over a period of more than one month (30 days).  On the basis of the test results, three categories of risk (high, medium and low) should be established relating to the previous microbiological testing history of despatched raw material. Continued sampling and monitoring for each category of despatched material should vary in accordance with the established risk factor, increasing for high risk and decreasing for low risk materials.

7.7 Samples should be collected, handled and tested in accordance with approved methods laid down in The Animal By-Products order 1999 (SI NO. 1999/646)1 at a Defra listed laboratory as approved under the order. isolations of salmonella should be serotyped by approved serotype reference methods.


1  The Animal By-products Order 1999 requires any person carrying on a business involving the processing of animal protein to register their business with Defra and take samples of processed material for testing for the presence of salmonella, using the approved methods set out in Schedule 3 of the Order, and at a laboratory authorisded by Defra, each day that product is consigned from the premises.

ADLib logo Content provided by the Agricultural Document Library
© University of Hertfordshire, 2011