ARCHIVE: Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs) - Guidance for Farmers. Standard values, manure sampling (Leaflet 3 - PB12736c)

4. Glossary of terms used in this Guidance

All other soils

means all soils which are not sandy or shallow.

Crop

any vegetation which is grown for agricultural profit or benefit, including grains, vegetables and fruit, grass and forage, horticulture and bulbs grown in open fields. It does not include protected crops grown under glass or crops under poly-tunnels.

Crop available nitrogen

the total nitrogen content of organic manure that is available for crop uptake in the growing season in which it is spread on land.

Dirty water

lightly contaminated run-off from lightly fouled concrete yards or from the dairy/parlour that is collected separately from slurry. It does not include liquids from weeping-wall stores, strainer boxes, slurry separators or silage effluent which are rich in nitrogen and regarded as slurries.

Farm

an area or areas of land and its buildings, which is used for the growing of crops or rearing of livestock, and includes livestock units and any outlying fields all of which form part of an individual farm business.

Farmyard manure (FYM)

livestock excreta that is mixed with straw bedding material, that can be stacked in a freestanding heap without slumping. See also ‘temporary field heap‘.

Grassland

land on which the vegetation consists predominantly of grass species.

High readily available N content

more than 30 per cent of the total N content of the organic manure is present in molecular forms that can be immediately taken up by the plant. Examples include cattle and pig slurry, most poultry manure, and liquid digested sludge.

Incorporation

a technique that achieves some mixing between the organic manure and the soil.

Land drain

a permanent drain installed below the surface of the ground that is effective in removing surplus water away from field soils. It does not include sealed, impermeable pipes.

Livestock

Means any animal (including poultry) in Schedule 1 of the Nitrate Pollution Prevention Regulations 2008, and includes pigs, cattle, sheep, goats, deer, horses and poultry.

Livestock manure N farm limit

a limit to the average loading of the total amount of nitrogen (N) in livestock manure across the area of a holding.

Low readily available N content

less than 30 per cent of the total N content of the organic manure is present in molecular forms that can be immediately taken up by the plant. Examples include straw based cattle and pig manure.

Low run-off risk land

land that has an average slope less than 3 degrees, does not have land drains (other than a sealed impermeable pipe), and is at least 50 metres from a watercourse or conduit leading to a watercourse.

Manufactured nitrogen fertiliser

any nitrogen fertiliser (other than organic manure) which is manufactured by an industrial process.

Manure N availability

the percentage of the total nitrogen content of organic manure that is available for crop uptake in the growing season in which it is spread on land.

Nitrogen fertiliser

any substance containing one or more nitrogen compounds or nitrogen compounds used on land to enhance growth of vegetation and includes organic manures (see Figure 2 of Leaflet 2).

Nitrate vulnerable zone (NVZ)

an area of land designated in accordance with Regulation 7 of the Regulations.

Organic manure

any nitrogen fertiliser derived from animal, human or plant sources, including livestock manure.

Organic manure N field limit

an annual upper limit of 250kg/ha for nitrogen from all livestock manures and all other organic materials applied to each field. It does not include manures deposited by grazing animals.

Organic producer

a producer with all the land on a holding that is listed on a valid certificate of organic registration issued by an Organic Inspection Body approved by the Advisory Committee on organic Standards.

Other nitrogen-containing materials

any substance containing nitrogen that is neither a manufactured nitrogen fertiliser nor an organic manure e.g. dredgings.

Poultry litter

a mixture of bedding material and poultry excreta which is sufficiently dry to be stored in a stack without slumping.

Poultry manure

excreta produced by poultry, including bedding material that is mixed with the excreta, but excluding duck manure with a readily available N content of 30 per cent or less.

Readily available nitrogen

the amount of nitrogen in organic manure that is present in molecular forms that can be immediately taken up by plants.

Sandy soil

soil over sandstone, and any other soil where –

(a) in the layer up to 40 cm deep, there are –

  1. more than 50 per cent by weight of sand-sized particles (particles from 0.06 to 2 mm diameter), and
  2. less than 18 per cent by weight of clay-sized particles (particles less than 0.02 mm diameter), and
  3. less than 5 per cent by weight of organic carbon, and

(b) in the layer from 40 to 80 cm depth, there are –

  1. more than 70 per cent by weight of sand-sized particles(particles from 0.06 to 2 mm diameter), and
  2. less than 15 percent by weight of clay-sized particles (particles less than 0.02 mm diameter), and
  3. less than 5 per cent by weight of organic carbon.
Shallow soil

soil which is less than 40 cm deep.

Slurry

excreta produced by livestock (other than poultry) while in a yard or building, (including any bedding, rainwater and washings mixed with it), that has a consistency that allows it to be pumped or discharged by gravity. The liquid fraction of separated slurry is also defined as slurry.

Soil nitrogen supply (SNS)

the amount of nitrogen (kg N/ha) in the soil that becomes available for uptake by the crop in the growing season, taking account of nitrogen losses.

Solid livestock manure

includes poultry manures (litter-based manures e.g. from broilers; and neat excreta e.g. from caged laying hens) and stackable farmyard manure (FYM) e.g. straw-based cattle and pig manure and any stackable separated fibre from the mechanical separation of slurry. See also ‘temporary field heap‘.

Solid manure

organic manure which can be stacked in a freestanding heap without slumping. See also ‘temporary field heap‘.

Spreading

includes application to the surface of the land, injection into the land or mixing with the surface layers of the land but does not include the direct deposition of excreta on to the land by animals.

Spring sown crop

any crop which is sown after 1 January and before 31 July in any year.

Standard values

Surface water

Temporary field heap

Farmyard manure or solid manure that does not give rise to free drainage of liquid from within the stacked material which is stored temporarily for up to 12 months on a field site.

Tillage land

land that is not being used for grass production and is sown with a crop.

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