Pigs: A Guide for New Owners

Feed Advice

It is illegal to feed catering waste or animal by-product to any farmed animal or any other ruminant animal, pig or poultry. The term "catering waste" includes all waste food including used cooking oil originating in restaurants, catering facilities and kitchens, including central kitchens and household kitchens. This definition, therefore, includes all kitchens including kitchens where vegetarian foods are prepared.

The effect of this ban is that you must not feed such material to farm animals, which includes any pig including pet pigs, nor let such animals have access to such material, nor bring such material onto holdings where such animals are kept.

The background to this is that following the outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease in 2001 the Government reviewed the practice of swill feeding and introduced a ban on the feeding of catering waste that contains, or has been in contact with, meat or meat products to pigs or poultry. Subsequently new EU legislation (1774/2002) on the disposal of animal by-products was introduced in 2002 and it similarly prohibits the feeding of catering waste and any animal by-product. Animal by-products means entire bodies or parts of animals or products of animal origin not intended for human consumption. The Animal By-Products Regulations 2003 provides national legislation for the administration and enforcement of EU Regulation 1774/2002.

No matter how tempting it may be to feed your animals with waste food or material that may contain meat or meat products, please remember that the first confirmed case of the 2001 outbreak of FMD was a holding where waste food was being fed to pigs. Contaminated waste food spreads viruses, such as Foot and Mouth Disease and bacteria, to farmed animals. Infected pigs can quickly infect neighbouring animals.

Your pigs want to be healthy, so help reduce the risk of future outbreaks of diseases by not feeding your pigs catering waste.

Below is a table which sets out the current controls on what may or may not be fed to pigs.

Summary of the current controls on the use of waste food in pig feed.

 

Waste food originating in…

 

…catering establishments1

…premises other than catering establishments2

Meat and products containing meat

x

x

Fish and products containing fish

Eggs and egg based products

x

x

x

x

Animal fats (e.g. lard)

Milk and other milk based products3

x

x

x

v3

Finished foods containing eggs, rennet or melted fat but where these are not the main ingredient4

Finished foods containing eggs but where these are the main ingredient5

x

 

x

v3

 

x

Sweets, jelly and other gelatin based products

Used cooking oil when obtained from approved processors

x

v6

v3

v3

Vegetable waste, cereals and other materials not containing products of animal origin

x

v3

Footnotes

1 i.e. central, domestic, and commercial kitchens; restaurants and other catering facilities.

2 e.g. bakeries; distributors; processing and packing plants, retail outlets, but only where meat is not used or handled or where strict HACCP procedures are in place.

3 providing this material originates either from premises which do not handle products of animal origin other than milk, milk products, eggs, gelatin, rennet or animal fats; or has HACCP procedures in place to ensure that no direct or indirect cross-contamination with products of animal origin can occur.

4 e.g. biscuits, bread, cakes, chocolate, pastry, sweets etc.

5 e.g. quiche etc.

6 the use of used cooking oil obtained from approved processors will only be permitted until 31 October 2004.

Please note: Milk and milk products are currently the subject of a proposal which, should it be adopted, would require these products to be further processed before being fed to pigs. Anyone producing pig feed is, therefore, advised to keep in touch with their local animal health office or to regularly check Defra’s Animal By-products internet site (see address below) for information on this and any other future changes to the controls explained here.

www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/by-prods/default.htm

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